Helping Kids Deal With Death

 

Simply clicking away from disturbing stories isn’t a solution to the problem that all parents face in this fallen world: helping our kids deal with death. Even if we do manage to click away (or turn off our televisions and radios), we can’t prevent our kids from learning about people dying – even young people, like them.

It’s challenging to know how to help kids who are grieving the traumatic news of other kids’ tragic deaths. Many professionals like psychiatrists and doctors try to help, but come up short. Yet, as a parent, you have more of an impact on your children than anyone else does – so you’re in the best position to help them deal with death.

Here’s how you can help your kids deal with death:

Start conversations gently:

If it’s clear that your kids have already learned about someone’s death (either a person in the news or someone they knew personally, such as a classmate or grandparent), don’t avoid talking about it. Your children may raise the subject with you, or they may not know how to do so – but they need your help to process the news whether or not they bring it up. Continue reading

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Helping children react to the thought of a parent’s death

 

Each child reacts to this complicated and heartbreaking issue in their own way. The answer depends on many factors, such as the child’s personality, his or her relationship to the sick parent, the age of the child, his or her maturity, and the child’s developmental needs—along with how close or distant the death is. Continue reading

Becoming a Dream Child, Its Possible !

Becoming a dream child is somewhat important to some children who don’t think they can live up to their parents’ standards. Here are some advice and tips on how to become that dream child. It is best if you are doing this for your own sake, not to be better than a sibling or for the sake of your parents. Continue reading

Why So Angry?

WHY SO ANGRY?

girlWhy do so many children get angry so often? Kids are getting furious even about little things like having to pick up their toys or not getting a Popsicle. These blowups are coming from kids who are ages 3, 4, 5, and older. These are children who we expected to have outgrown tantrums. Although some deeply angry children may need professional counseling, that’s not the case with the majority of now-common anger. It’s a side effect of today’s most popular parenting practice. Continue reading

Teen Pregnancy Prevention

Tips for Preventing Teen Pregnancy

The best way parents can help prevent teenage pregnancy is by building close, strong, open relationships with their children long before they reach their teen years. The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy offers these additional tips for parents. Continue reading

Typical Teen Behaviours

The teenage years are marked by trying on independence through experimentation. Typical teen behavior includes many things that seem strange to parents. Dyed hair, odd piercings, strange music and even new friends are all part of growing up for some teens. And some teenagers also choose this period in life as a time to experiment with alcohol and drugs, and sometimes sex. Continue reading

Assertive vs. Aggressive – Helping Teen Understand

Dictionary.com defines assertive as “confidently aggressive or self-assured; positive: aggressive; dogmatic”. They define aggressive as “vigorously energetic, especially in the use of initiative and forcefulness”. Being aggressive and being assertive are often confused because of different points of view. Being assertive can be healthy and positive, but being aggressive definitely is not.
Continue reading