Why The Kids Do Not Listen To Their Parents

“I call out to my kids many times in a day  but they never listen.”

The frustration on this parent’s face was clear. We were part-way through a recent parenting workshop I was running when the issue arose.

The most common responses you get from the parents while asking the simple question, “When your children want your attention, what do you normally say or do?” Continue reading

Advertisements

Teaching Good Manners to Your Children

We all know those children.

The ones who say please and thank you. Who share without whining. Who ask to be excused before they leave the table.

Sometimes they’re our very own children, behaving in a way that reminds us we’re doing something right. But other times, those same kids are melting down at Chili’s or using their fingers as tools for nasal exploration. Continue reading

Helping Kids To Listen and Respond!

As parents we spend so much of our time talking to our kids — and then wonder why they don’t seem to hear us. In heated moments, we find ourselves stuck in power struggles, but can’t figure out what to say to stop the fighting. Sometimes we just don’t know how to answer a tough question. Continue reading

How to make Kids Listen to You!

20 Ways To Talk So Your Kids Will Listen

The WAY we talk to our kids has a huge impact on their learning and ability to listen to us.

I have found that there are generally three different ways that parents communicate with their kids. The first one is in an aggressive way. These parents yell a lot, put their kids down and use attacking words. Their children respond in many different ways, mainly by playing up a lot more, feeling fearful, yelling back and ignoring their parents’ constant orders.

The second form of communication commonly seen is a passive form. These parents mutter soft, cautious words and tones to their kids finding that they run riot and walk all over them. Unfortunately these parents are so passive that sometimes when they are pushed to their limits, they suddenly turn their communication into an aggressive tone. Continue reading

Lying and Stealing

Lying and Stealing

 

Lying and stealing are common, but inappropriate behavior in toddlers and school-aged children. While some severe forms of these behaviors can indicate a more serious psychological problem, most of the time it is simply a common behavior that will be outgrown. Lying and stealing are more common in boys than girls, and occur most often in children ages 2 to 8 years.

The bad news is: Your two-year-old may be a liar. The good news is: If she is, it’s a sign of advanced cognitive skills.

Although previously, the youngest age at which children were known to lie was 3½, in an experiment by Brock University psychologist Angela Evans, lies were told by:

  • 25 per cent of two-year-olds.
  • 50 per cent of three-year-olds.
  • 80 per cent of four-year-olds. Continue reading